Habits Caused by OCD is Like Getting Hooked Into Nicotine – And How You Can Quit

DISCLAIMER: This article is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Please consult your doctor if you need assistance.

I am the Prophet Driller of Drillimation Systems. Suppose you’re having compulsive behavior like me such as hair twirling and running inside a building that can interfere with your everyday operations and cause distress. In that case, that’s a warning sign of obsessive-compulsive disorder. You may already have it and not even know it. While OCD isn’t curable, the good news is that you can quit these behaviors. It all depends on who you are, where you live, or how much money you make.

It’s never too late to quit compulsive behaviors. There are dozens of free resources that can help you begin your quit journey. Quitting compulsive behavior will improve your mental health and reduce your risk of certain conditions such as dermatitis. I have one powerful message to say: If you have a compulsion that you think is being caused by OCD, quit now. Or better yet, if you see somebody else doing it, don’t even start.

This is what I would send to the Barber National Institute if I ever secure a marketing deal with them. This could also widen my presence and get Drillimation’s image to more and more people.

My Story

What caused you to do those rituals?

Not all effects of autism are bad. Some of the autistic tend to pursue collecting as a hobby – that was one of my favorite pastimes. But how did the negative effect of running inside buildings come into effect? Well, pretty much everyone on my mother’s side was athletic, and my brother did it too, meaning I ended up doing the same thing.

The other thing was hair twirling, whose cause was unknown.

What are some of the effects of it?

Running inside buildings can put you in great danger much in the same way as driving a car or any vehicle. If you mess up, serious injury from a fall or smacking into an object can result. I never thought at the age of 20 it would throw me in the hospital because it generated an incision that required sutures to fix. Never did I think it would change my life forever. So, my tip is, if you’re having this issue, quit now.

Hair twirling is usually called trichotillomania (often shortened to TTM). If left untreated, TTM can cause alopecia as a result of bald patches being generated.

How did you quit doing those rituals?

Quitting compulsive rituals is difficult. Don’t even stop at one try. I tried to quit numerous times and continuously kept getting the grudge. After talking to my doctor two days before I wrote this article, I figured that through exercise and counseling, I would end up quitting for good.

For the house-running ritual: Walking every day and wearing socks can resist the urge.

For the hair-twirling ritual: This one was much more difficult. I had to learn the reasons why I wanted to quit this ritual. I felt that playing Super Mario Maker, eating snacks, taking deep breaths, and practicing Buddhist meditation rituals helped stop that trigger.

However, one of the biggest challenges was having to deal with withdrawal symptoms from those rituals. Yes, it is uncomfortable but it won’t hurt you. I am managing them, and I am hoping to succeed in the coming days.

How are you maintaining that quit?

Many people who have OCD and quit a specific ritual could end up slipping and starting that ritual again. It is common, so don’t go too hard on yourself. If you slip, restart the quit process. Remember to ask friends and family if you need help, avoid stressful situations, and thank friends for their support. Always understand your triggers and knowing them can help you fight them off.

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